American Idioms and Expressions

Make A Mountain Out Of A Molehill Idiom

This database is a comprehensive collection of all the American idioms and slang available. American Idioms are many and varied. We hope you enjoy our collection. We are adding more all the time. .

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make a mountain out of a molehill
What does make a mountain out of a molehill mean?
make something seem much more important than it really is."Calm down. There's really nothing to worry about.You're making a mountain out of a molehill."
make a mountain out of a molehill
What does make a mountain out of a molehill mean?
make a big problem out of a small problemHe is making a mountain out of a molehill by worrying about his son`s problem.
make a mountain out of a molehill
What does make a mountain out of a molehill mean?
to make something that is unimportant seem importantYou are making a mountain out of a molehill when you talk about the mistake.
make a mountain out of a molehill
What does make a mountain out of a molehill mean?
to make something that is unimportant seem important You are making a mountain out of a molehill when you talk about the mistake.

make a mountain out of a molehill
What does make a mountain out of a molehill mean?
to make a big problem out of a small problem The man is making a mountain out of a molehill by worrying about his son`s problem.


Some Random Idioms
Irons in the fire
What does "Irons in the fire" mean?
Having or pursuing multiple opportunities simultaneously.I have been out of work for 6 months, but I have a number of irons in the fire.
Blacksmiths traditionally worked iron into shape by hammering. The iron being worked would be heated in the fire until it was red-hot and malleable. The Smith removes the iron from the fire and shapes it with repeated blows from a hammer. They need to work quickly before the iron cools. Once the iron is cool, it becomes brittle and cannot be hammered.
Once removed from the fire, the iron cools quickly. It takes longer to heat the iron to red-hot than it takes for it to cool. Blacksmiths work more efficiently by having multiple pieces of iron in the fire heating simultaneously. In that way, the Smith can always have a piece of iron red-hot and ready for hammering. The cooled piece would be returned to the fire if it needed more hammering.
keep one's finger's crossed
What does "keep one's finger's crossed" mean?
to wish for good luck"I will keep my fingers crossed that you are able to get the new job that you have applied for."
if the shoe fits wear it
What does "if the shoe fits wear it" mean?

by the nape of one's neck
What does "by the nape of one's neck" mean?
by the back of the neck The man picked up the cat by the nape of the neck.

a tightwad
What does "a tightwad" mean?
: someone who is very frugal and unwilling to spend money unnecessarily. A: Will Charlie donate any money to the activities fund? B: Absolutely not! He's a real tightwad!"
chicken out (of something)
What does "chicken out (of something)" mean?
to stop doing something because of fearI chickened out of jumping into the lake from the high diving board.
not know whether/if one is coming or going
What does "not know whether/if one is coming or going" mean?
to be very confusedMy friend did not know whether he was coming or going after he got off the long airplane flight.
with all one`s heart (and soul)
What does "with all one`s heart (and soul)" mean?
with all one's energy and feelingI tried with all my heart to get my friend a job at my company.
keep a secret
What does "keep a secret " mean?
to not tell a secret to othersI have been trying to keep a secret about my friend's boyfriend for a long time now.
Blow your own horn
What does "Blow your own horn" mean?
If you blow your own horn, you boast about your achievements and abilities. ('Blow your own trumpet' is an alternative form.)
out of practice
What does "out of practice" mean?
to be performing poorly due to a lack of practiceI am out of practice and I cannot play the trumpet very well at all.
as busy as popcorn on a skillet
What does "as busy as popcorn on a skillet" mean?
very active The children were as busy as popcorn on a skillet when the teacher entered the classroom.

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