American Idioms and Expressions

Argue For The Sake Of Arguing/argument Idiom

This database is a comprehensive collection of all the American idioms and slang available. American Idioms are many and varied. We hope you enjoy our collection. We are adding more all the time. .

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argue for the sake of arguing/argument
What does argue for the sake of arguing/argument mean?
to argue only to be different and to not agreeMy friend's brother always argues for the sake of arguing.

Some Random Idioms
knit one's brow
What does "knit one's brow" mean?
wrinkle one's brow by frowningThe teacher knit his brow and looked sternly at the child.
better to be the head of a dog than the tail of a lion
What does "better to be the head of a dog than the tail of a lion" mean?
it is better to be the leader of a small group than a follower of a bigger one The young athlete always played for his hometown team rather than moving to a larger city with a bigger team. He thought that it was better to be the head of a dog than the tail of a lion.

here and now
What does "here and now" mean?
immediatelyI want you to do that work right here and now.
bring (something) to a head
What does "bring (something) to a head" mean?
to cause something to reach a point where a decision or some action is necessaryThe accident will bring the issue of safety to a head during the next meeting.
You scratch my back and I'll scratch yours.
What does "You scratch my back and I'll scratch yours." mean?
if you will do me a favor, I will do you a favorThe construction industry is known for its practice of you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours.
emperor's new clothes
What does "emperor's new clothes" mean?
used when many people believe something that is not true, a situation in which people are afraid to criticize something because everyone else seems to think that it is good or important It was like the emperor's new clothes when nobody would criticize the popular politician although he was doing many bad things.

have a finger in the pie
What does "have a finger in the pie" mean?
to be involved in something, to have a role in somethingThe waitress has a finger in the pie of the new restaurant.
head over heels
What does "head over heels" mean?
upside down, head firstThe little boy fell head over heels down the steep hill.
in this day and age
What does "in this day and age" mean?
presently, currentlyIn this day and age it is almost impossible to find a store that sells the old style of cassette tape players.
mark my word(s)
What does "mark my word(s)" mean?
remember what I'm telling you"Mark my words, if you do not finish your homework project you are not going to go out this weekend."

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